Monday, 24 January 2011

A few words...


burberry prorsum fall winter 2011 / ph: gq.com

i previously wrote a long heartful blogpost about my experience in using burberry's new "click-to-chat" service, which ran during the period of the pre-orders (which ended yesterday). i wrote about the glitch on their website, in which the above coat was incorrectly priced for a few hours, and subsequently corrected. there were a few emails with the customer services team, and they acknowledged the slight system issue. they gave me a call to explain the issue, which i felt was a very personable gesture. there was an error and they wanted to put things right. it is comforting to know that this company with sales exceeding £1 billion annually, still values each and every customers' feedback and response.

the overall experience, from the initial "click" to the final phone call, has been really pleasant. ask me a year ago and i would say that people would still head to brick and mortar stores for their luxury goods purchase as opposed to buying online. there's the personable service in stores in this relationship business, that i felt couldn't be replicated online. and now burberry proofed that with a bit of innovation and effort it can be done. and it makes me happy, as i invested in the right company. ok not talking a majority stake here, but still a few coats worth.

and oh, i bought the coat.





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20 comments:

  1. great score. love double-breasted coats.

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  2. gorgeous coat...
    how.....much..?;;;;;

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  3. sorry for the out of topic here.

    may I ask if you could tell by looking at the pictures in this link (http://cgi.ebay.ph/Jaeger-LeCoultre-18K-GOLD-17J-MANUAL-Mid-sized-Watch-/160534089888?pt=Wristwatches&hash=item256093d0a0)if the Jaeger Lecoultre watch is authentic?

    Thank you.

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  4. i bet that personal touch and concern contributed in the push that made you buy the coat. it's nice how burberry does their experiential marketing.

    nouveauskin.blogspot.com

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  5. great buying! :)

    btw i need to talk to you...... i'm heading to bali in march and need some infos regarding the island.

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  6. I also experienced that Burberry's customer service responds to customers' feedback promptly: I ordered a coat online and was very diappointed finding out that the coat was made in China when unwrapping it. Well, call me naïve, but I didn't expect that from a brand like Burberry and a coat that cost nearly EUR 1,000. I'm still dissatisfied, but their response was quick.

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  7. Puh-lease, What difference does it make if it's Made in China?! It matters HOW it's made, not WHERE it's made. You might want to climb down off that very high horse of yours every once in a while, you know, just to reacquaint yourself, even if flightingly, with something we call reality.

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  8. Stunning, stunning coat. Though I was not impressed with most of the collection, that coat and a couple of others (one in a tan herringbone and another fur-collared one) stood out as being fantastic. I love how slim the cut is, and the material looks superb. Congratulations!

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  9. woooooooonderful coat!!

    i want one like this!!


    amazing post, an other time.

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  10. Its a bit too feminine looking for my taste. I thought it was just the model, but the coat pockets, buttons and the fur collar makes it look like something from Coronation street in the 60's. Just my opinion :/

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  11. I would be disappointed, too, if I found out that a coat I spent most of my monthly income on was made in a country with notoriously bad working conditions and very low wages - and just imagine the ecological footprint caused by transportation. That's a fact we cannot deny and it doesn't have anything to do with sitting on a high horse. It's common sense that just because something's supposed to be "reality" doesn't mean we have to condone it.

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  12. Oh Anonymous (above),

    First, do you know what country it was made in? And have you witnessed those working conditions first-hand at the textile factory? If you haven't, why not go visit and then come back with facts.

    Second, it's great that you're looking out for those with bad working conditions and very low wages - let's just pull production from these countries! Better that these workers have no work and no food at all. I am with you in refusing to condone their survival when they could just suffer even worse. But then I'm sure you have a way to fix that by personally forcing the market and the world to buy goods at even higher prices so that they can made at a living wage - since scarcity doesn't exist and neither does competition for labor!

    Grow up.

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  13. That's a reason why I never buy clothes online. I want to know where they're made. Not because I don't trust in the quality so much, but because of the conditions under which they're made (which I don't want to encourage). I found an interesting article online (http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=3031). It's about the sports shoe industry, but as the documentary "China Blue" (http://fashioninganethicalindustry.org/resources/ChinaBlue/chinablue/) showed, there's not much difference to the fashion industry. I think we shouldn't be too fashion obsessed to see the downside of this industry. People should get paid equally. There's no need for higher prices, companies would just have to accept a cut in their profit margin like they do over here in Europe. I know, it's probably illusory to get companies to rethink, but there should be debate on the principles, don't you think?

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  14. Sorry, but no, there shouldn't be debates on conceptually empty principles that you haven't really thought through. There are better ways to spend one's time.

    If you want to have a productive debate, do some research and reading about corporations, wages, and the economic dynamics of them. Corporations that create more profits become bigger corporations that employ more people, can sell their products for cheaper, and thus save their customers a bunch of money, leading those customers to have more money to buy more, create more profits, and lay the foundations of actual economic stability for the workers who the corporations employ.

    Your ideas cause the opposite to happen. No debate necessary; it's just a matter of fact. There's plenty of literature and reputable data out there, trust me. Read it before jumping on the moral soapbox like so many others.

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  15. hey can we stop this now, let's co-exist happily. this is to share the joy of acquiring the coat, so happy thoughts :)

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  16. I am deeply sorry for having caused such a furor - I forgot: Ignorance is bliss! So let us go back to leading a shallow life and pretending everything is alright - some of us at least.

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what's he wearing?